Location

Abraham Lincoln Marovitz Courtroom

Event Website

http://www.kentlaw.iit.edu/institutes-centers/institute-on-the-supreme-court-of-the-united-states/iscotus-events/symposium-supreme-court-american-public

Start Date

16-11-2012 10:30 AM

End Date

16-11-2012 12:00 PM

Description

Presentations on Ideology, Neutrality, and Self-Deception in public cultural cognition in relation to the Supreme Court.

Dan Kahan (Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology, Yale Law School) discusses the parallels between presenting valid science and neutral judicial decision-making to the public and the public's conflicts between expert knowledge and their own pattern recognition. Dan Simon (Richard L. and Maria B. Crutcher Professor of Law and Psychology, USC Gould School of Law) and Nicholas Scurich (Assistant Professor of Psychology & Social Behavior, and Criminology, Law & Society, School of Social Ecology, UC-Irvine) present on judicial reasoning, aporia, and the coherence effect. Tom Tyler (Macklin Fleming Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology, Yale Law School) presents on the deference effect. Carolyn Shapiro (Associate Professor of Law and Director of ISCOTUS, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law) discusses the impression of neutrality and its shifts in the public eye.

This is the third of five sessions from the Symposium on the Supreme Court and the American Public, hosted by IIT Chicago-Kent's Institute on the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Nov 16th, 10:30 AM Nov 16th, 12:00 PM

Ideology, Neutrality, and Self-Deception: What the Supreme Court Says and What the Public Hears

Abraham Lincoln Marovitz Courtroom

Presentations on Ideology, Neutrality, and Self-Deception in public cultural cognition in relation to the Supreme Court.

Dan Kahan (Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology, Yale Law School) discusses the parallels between presenting valid science and neutral judicial decision-making to the public and the public's conflicts between expert knowledge and their own pattern recognition. Dan Simon (Richard L. and Maria B. Crutcher Professor of Law and Psychology, USC Gould School of Law) and Nicholas Scurich (Assistant Professor of Psychology & Social Behavior, and Criminology, Law & Society, School of Social Ecology, UC-Irvine) present on judicial reasoning, aporia, and the coherence effect. Tom Tyler (Macklin Fleming Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology, Yale Law School) presents on the deference effect. Carolyn Shapiro (Associate Professor of Law and Director of ISCOTUS, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law) discusses the impression of neutrality and its shifts in the public eye.

This is the third of five sessions from the Symposium on the Supreme Court and the American Public, hosted by IIT Chicago-Kent's Institute on the Supreme Court of the United States.

http://scholarship.kentlaw.iit.edu/sscap/Presentations/Friday/2